The Fortnight Garden in late May

Yes, I know it is mid-June, but it is been busy! And for this post it was the three-week garden because I had been in Portugal – yes, wonderful! And there will be posts about Portugal on London Traveller. The garden in Suffolk hadn’t grown quite as much as I expected in my absence, but with the help of a kind neighbour it has come through the dry weather; nevertheless the weekend was spent watering and doing some gentle tidying.

Succession Planting in the Suffolk Garden

I am slowly beginning to understand what succession planting might mean – people talk about it as a way of ensuring that there is always something interesting in the garden, but I think it could also allow me to change the feel and character of the garden as the seasons change – like wearing different outfilts at different times of the year.

Summer in Suffolk

The Suffolk garden, now in its fifth growing season, is slowly maturing.

William Shakespeare Rose, Calamagrostis Brachytricha, Alchemilla Mollis
William Shakespeare Rose, Calamagrostis Brachytricha, Alchemilla Mollis
Alchemilla Mollis, with lavender and Graham Thomas in the background
Alchemilla Mollis, with lavender and Graham Thomas in the background

And at the other side of the house –

Bergenias, Tellima Grandiflora, Japanese Anemones, Viburnum davidii, and Cornus Alba 'Elegantissima'
Bergenias, Tellima Grandiflora, Japanese Anemones, Viburnum davidii, and Cornus Alba ‘Elegantissima’

 

Brunnera ‘Jack Frost’

I looked at the forget-me-nots and they looked tired, so it was time to wield the secateurs. Those anenomes which looked so healthy a month ago were terrorising the forget-me-nots! The bees were not very happy but it was definitely time to allow the leaves to develop.

Brunnera 'Jack Frost' with rapidly growing anenomes
Brunnera ‘Jack Frost’ with rapidly growing anenomes one month ago
Brunner 'Jack Frost'
Brunner ‘Jack Frost’
Brunnera 'Jack Frost' with new leaves
Brunnera ‘Jack Frost’ with new leaves

Bee in the Brunnera flowers