The Fortnight Garden at the beginning of April

What a mess! This little patch hasn’t had any attention at all for nearly three months and it shows! Nevertheless it has been getting on growing as best it can, and so here are my Six on Saturday in The Fortnight Garden at the beginning of April. My plan for the next weeks was a lot of vigorous gardening but a slippage in my lower back has put that plan on hold. At least I can still hold the camera!

The City Garden at the end of February

Here we are in the City Garden at the end of February and I have been totally silent for quite a while! I have, however, been busy with several other activities – a short IT course, a few tailoring lessons, and a photography exhibition. I have told myself it isn’t gardening weather but just recently I have managed an hour or two and so here I am with my Six on Saturday!

Dalston Eastern Curve & Open Garden Squares Weekend

Dalston Eastern Curve is a peaceful and calming site created from a derelict railway line and now well-patronised by local people. The black fencing and vibrant mural don’t prepare you for the green haven where gardener Emma plants in deep shade and patches of sunlight. Do visit during Open Garden Squares Weekend, or at any time during the year and support her hard work and then sit down with a cup of tea and the excellent lemon and polenta cake and relax into the peace.

The Fortnight Garden in late June

Three weeks had passed since I was in Suffolk and after days of extreme heat I wondered what I would find. There is no watering system in the garden and the plants just have to do the best they can. To my relief the garden had come through – it was dry and clearly gasping for water, but it was alive!

The Fortnight Garden in early June

Wow! What a change! It had been a fortnight since I was last in Suffolk and the roses were out – absolutely gorgeous!

William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare

Graham Thomas
Graham Thomas

And Rosa Canina in the hedge
And Rosa Canina in the hedge

 

Dry & shady corner

I have a large laurel tree in one corner of the garden – it was meant to be a laurel bush, providing bay leaves for cooking, but I forgot to prune it… The 30-years tree was uncovered last year when the garden was restructured and it is the area in the tree’s shade which is giving me problems. It is light, not dark, and there is an hour of sunshine in the late afternoon, but that is all. I don’t want to leave it completely unplanted so I need to find plants which will flourish in these conditions.

Shady Corner
I am going to try these plants:
Acanthus Mollis – I have cuttings from the garden in Suffolk so would like to use ‘free’ plants first. The problem will be the snails – will the plants establish before they are eaten to pieces.
Cornus ‘Flaviramea’ – an unwanted bush travelled down from the Suffolk garden.
Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ – I have two bushes which I hope will establish. They grew quite well in the first year, supported by a metal hoop, and the buds are swelling nicely at the moment.

Acanthus Mollis (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Acanthus_mollis5.jpg)

Hydrangea 'Annabelle'
Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’

And underneath and roundabout I am going for plants which are reliable:
Saxifrage ‘London Pride’, Bergenia ‘Abendglut’, Euphorbia ‘Amgdaloides’, and I am thinking about Brunnera ‘Jack Frost’. 
I would love to tuck in some Iris Foetidissima somewhere, and what about Myrrhis Odorata – Sweet Cicely

What do you think? Will it work?

You may be interested in
The Greener Dream – super blogsite with lots of information & source of photo of ‘London Pride’

The shady, damp border

OK, I have made decisions and the plants are in! This is roughly the plan – the number of plants is not exact, but their position is correct.
Flint Wall Border

Grasses in Beth Chatto’s Garden

There were some wonderful grasses in flower: Carex Elata ‘Aurea’, Molinia, Stipa Calamagrostis, Pennisetum ‘Villosum’ (I think), and many others.

Molina flowers & Shuttlecock Fern
Molina flowers & Shuttlecock Fern

Pennisetum 'Villosum'
Pennisetum ‘Villosum’, I think

 

 

 

Perennials in Piet Oudolf’s Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe

The perennials, as well as the grasses, are looking absolutely gorgeous in this wonderful garden.

Planting for an entrance

The entrance gate makes the first statement about the property and gives a hint of what lies beyond. What should it say about you? Organised? Conventional? Imaginative?