Houghton Hall’s Walled Garden

The Walled Garden was redesigned in 1991 when ‘..the space was divided into several contrasting ‘ornamental gardens’. These include spectacular double-sided herbaceous borders, Italian garden, formal rose parterre (with over 150 varieties of rose), fruit and vegetable garden, glass house, rustic temple, statues, fountains and Jeppe Hein’s ‘Waterflame’..’. It was a very gloomy, windy, chilly day so the photographs are rather sombre.

Houghton Hall Walled Garden Plan
Houghton Hall Walled Garden Plan

The Italian Garden is on the left as one’s walks into the Walled Garden – a cool, green, elegant space – lovely.

The Italian Garden
The Italian Garden
The Italian Garden
The Italian Garden

The Formal Rose Garden is opposite the Italian Garden and very ‘English’, with beds, borders, statues, and fountains.

The formal rose garden, Houghton Hall
The formal rose garden, Houghton Hall
The formal rose garden, Houghton Hall
The formal rose garden, Houghton Hall
The formal rose garden, Houghton Hall
The hedging around the formal rose garden, Houghton Hall

There are two very large fruit and vegetable gardens in the Walled Garden, with lots of espaliered fruit trees, and even fruit trees grown over arches. It seemed to me that the emphasis was on creating beautiful gardens rather than heavily productive vegetable beds – but perhaps I am wrong..?

The Old Apple Orchard in the Walled Garden
The Old Apple Orchard in the Walled Garden
The Fruit Garden, Houghton Hall
The Fruit Garden, Houghton Hall
The fruit cage in the Walled Garden
The fruit cage in the Walled Garden

The dahlia border on one side of the fruit and vegetables was interesting because the flowers are grown in squares of supporting canes. There were some wonderful blooms, including Gerry Hoek, a dahlia which my mother loved to grow and which I remember from my childhood in Pretoria.

The Dahlia Border
The Dahlia Border
Dahlia 'Karma Choc'?
Dahlia ‘Karma Choc’?

The Mediterranean Garden has box hedging and a fountain and was peaceful.

The Mediterranean Garden in the Walled Garden
The Mediterranean Garden in the Walled Garden

Alongside the walls was this formal garden – there are 5 acres to fill!

15-8-13 Houghton Hall LR-5332

The herbaceous borders in the middle of the Walled Garden are English in style and quite startling after wandering through Piet Oudolf’s swathes of colour at Pensthorpe.

There was even a rustic temple!

The Rustic Temple in the Walled Garden
The Rustic Temple in the Walled Garden

And there were beautiful hydrangeas along the outside ‘walls’ of the Walled Garden.

Manicured hedging in the Walled Garden
Manicured hedging in the Walled Garden

 

Houghton Hall

Houghton Hall is situated in North Norfolk and one of the most extraordinary grand country estates I have ever seen – opulent, lavish, elegant, and with an amazing walled garden.

Houghton Hall
Houghton Hall, North Norfolk

Perennials in Piet Oudolf’s Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe

The perennials, as well as the grasses, are looking absolutely gorgeous in this wonderful garden.

Piet Oudolf’s Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe

I returned to Pensthorpe to linger in Piet Oudolf’s Millennium Garden which seemed even more beautiful than ten days ago. The grasses are wonderful and the perennials are in full bloom. Don’t miss visiting this garden!

Molinia Caerulea 'Transparent' at Pensthorpe
Molinia Caerulea ‘Transparent’ at Pensthorpe
Molinia
Molinia
Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe
Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe
Carex, Pensthorpe
Carex

Flowering grass15-8-13 Pensthorpe LR-5236You may be interested in
How to grow Molinia
Where to buy grasses

Pensthorpe Nature Reserve

I visited Pensthorpe to see the Millennium Garden designed by Piet Oudolf – it was heavenly!

East Ruston, The Old Vicarage Garden

The Old Vicarage Garden in East Ruston, Norfolk, is a remarkable and amazing achievement. I visited on a hot day and in the smaller courtyards, surrounded by hedges and high trees it felt like the tropics! The gardens are only open from 2.00-5.30 and you need all that time to really enjoy the plantings and understand the garden. And a tea house will provide a half-time break.

The gardens cover c.32 acres and were established about twenty years ago. The first action taken by the owners was to plant trees around the property, providing protection from the sea winds and creating the micro-climate so obvious on my visit.

The fuchsias were beautiful, planted in over-size containers and many years old. The container plantings reminded me of the importance of scale – to make an impact, even in a small garden, you need to plant big! I have no idea how to identify the varieties but will try with the help of this site.

Fuchsia
Fuchsia ?
Fuchsia
Fuchsia ?
Fuchsia
Fuchsia ?
Fuchsia
Fuchsia ?

There were many vistas and views and I could do a whole post – but I need more photographs!

Looking down the Kings Walk towards the house
Looking down the Kings Walk towards the house
The lavender walk - with a bit of Carolyn!
The Apple Walk – with a bit of Carolyn!
From one room to another
From one room to another
East Ruston Church in the distance
East Ruston Church in the distance

And plants which were beautiful on the day –

Clematis
Clematis ?
Waterlilies in the Exotic Garden
Waterlilies in the Exotic Garden
The Rose Garden
The Rose Garden
Rose
Rose ?
Astilbe ? with Allium seed heads
Astilbe ? with Allium seed heads

Angel's Fishing Rod

Angel’s Fishing Rod – Dierama

And plants which I have never seen before –

New Zealand?
From New Zealand?
From New Zealand?
From New Zealand?

I took away an idea for planting my patio in London – I need to think of BIG containers, and I need to grow standard and bush fuchsias.