Parc Botanique de Haute Bretagne – Garden of Arcady

As in 2015 the first day in France included a visit to the Parc Botanique de Haute Bretagne. But unlike 2015 this was a more selective visit – I didn’t try to see everything in the garden.

Plan of the Gardens (http://www.parcs-et-jardins.net/plan.html)

The entrance to the Parc is down the Alley of White Pearls, a path lined with Hydrangea Paniculata and the beginning of the Garden of Arcady. The three sets of gardens are apparently meant to evoke the three seasons of LifeSpring, Summer, and Autumn.

Hydrangea Paniculata at the entrance to the Parc Botanique de Haute Bretagne

Cornus Variegata Hydrangea Paniculata

The Walled Garden or Cité Antique looked rather dry and somewhat neglected this year, but there were still some pretty things to see and enjoy such as the Greek Theatre and some of the flowers. But overall it was crying out for attention.

16-9-1-parc-botanique-de-haute-bretagne-8697

The Walled Garden

Jjust outside The Walled Garden were two beautiful flowering Hibiscus, and a Persian Silk Tree (Albizia Julibrissin). The tree is lovely but seems to be regarded as an invasive pest in many parts of the world, with recommendations not to plant it.

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Persian Silk Tree (Albizia)
Persian Silk Tree (Albizia)

I liked the shaped bamboo cones in the Lotus Pond, but on this day there were no lotus flowers.

Bamboo cones in the Lotus Pond

The Secret Garden was absolutely wonderful! The Hydrangea Paniculata were still white, and abundant. It is apparently based on a Mediaeval idea of a secret garden for quiet contemplation.

The Secret Garden, Parc Botanique de Haute Bretagne

Hydrangea Paniculata Hydrangea Paniculata

In the Garden of Dionysus there were these wonderful plants – a variety of Hedychium Coccineum – sorry, that is all I can manage! And I also found some beautiful blue mop head hydrangeas.

Hedychium Coccineum Hedychium Coccineum Hedychium Coccineum Blue hydrangeas

The Jardins Romantiques and Crépuscules will follow in the next posts!

Further information
Brief commentaries on the different ‘rooms’ in the garden

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Vineyards is more than vineyards: there is a manor house dating from 1570 with later additions, and ‘..gardens which include a rose garden, topiary, herb garden, vegetable garden, maze, dell, wild garden, nuttery and an orchard, in addition to a commercial vineyard adjoining the site…’.

The house is a startling pinky-orange colour.

Wyken Hall

Wyken Hall

Wyken Hall

Wyken Hall

To one side is a maze, which is quite fun, and a quiet pond next to the dell.

The Maze at Wyken Hall The Pond at Wyken Hall

The Dell at Wyken Hall

Next to the house the planting is formal.

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall Gardens

The ‘Hot Borders’ were very dramatic!

Wyken Hall Gardens

Wyken Hall GardensWyken Hall GardensWyken Hall Gardens

And the vegetable garden was colourful…

A last look…Wyken Hall

Lexham Gardens – Open Garden Squares 2016

I visited Lexham Gardens during the Open Garden Squares Weekend and it was like being on a village green as the residents were celebrating with their Annual Garden Party. Free drinks as we came through the gate – wonderful! – people chatting everywhere, and the children (and adults) enjoying a wonderful magician.

Lexham GardensLexham Gardens

Lexham Gardens

Lexham Gardens is part of the original Manor of Kensington which was given to the De Vere family by William the Conqueror. (Bina Gardens, Nevern Square, and Earls Court Square are also within this historical manor.) The houses were developed in the 1870s and the gardens laid out in 1877. The original occupants of the square were professional people, and particularly army officers and their families. Today the gardens are privately owned. Renovation in the 1990s divided the gardens into compartments, with a little stream, and overgrown, secret walks leading to an open lawn. Beyond that is a rose garden. And everywhere there are interesting trees and plants.Lexham GardensLexham Gardens

Lexham GardensLexham Gardens

Lexham Gardens

Lexham Gardens

Lexham Gardens Lexham Gardens

Further information
The history of the Manor of Kensington
The history of Lexham Gardens

 

Earls Court Square – Open Garden Squares 2016

I visited Earls Court Square during Open Garden Squares Weekend in June.

Nevern Square – Open Garden Squares 2016

The houses around Nevern Square were developed from the 1880s and the gardens were laid out 1885-86. Before that it was green fields and market gardens in the Manor of Kensington.

Gledhow Gardens – Open Garden Squares 2016

From Bina Gardens I strolled to Gledhow Gardens, another amazing green space hidden between tall buildings, some of which front on to a busy main road. The gardens are owned by the residents and date back to the 1840s when the Gunter family started building in the area. The gardens were laid out in the 1890s.

Gledhow Gardens

Gledhow GardensGledhow Gardens

Gledhow Gardens

The trees in the square are particularly beautiful.

Gledhow GardensGledhow Gardens

There was this pretty flower – does anyone know what it is? And a lovely violet fuchsia (Gayrigg?).

Fuchsia in Gledhow Gardens

The Philadelphus was in full flower, and there were at least two varieties (Virginal and perhaps Beauclerk) .

There were lots of pretty geraniums (Geranium Oxonianum, I think), and some roses.

Rose bud in Gledhow Gardens

Bina Gardens – Open Garden Squares 2016

This year I visited gardens between Earls Court and Gloucester Road underground stations during the Open Garden Squares Weekend, starting with Bina Gardens East.

This peaceful and lush garden has been cleverly designed and planted to created different areas and climates. Treed walks are filled with shade-loving plants, and the play of light through the leaves is marvellous.

A walkway in Bina Gardens East

Palms in Bina Gardens East

Bina Gardens East

There are unusual plants and trees – variegated Kerria and Cornus help to lighten the narrow space. Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ is a delight, and the Paperbark Birch tree is beautiful.

Salvia 'Hot Lips' in Bina Gardens EastPaperbark Birch in Bina Gardens East

Bina Gardens East

This is a quiet, peaceful haven hidden between the buildings and created by enthusiastic triumvirate of ladies. Do visit next year!

Bina Gardens East

 Bina Gardens East

Bina Gardens East

Bina Gardens East

Michelle Meilland in Greenwich Park

I look forward to seeing this rose every year. Just for a few weeks I enjoy the whirl of pink petals and it is a special joy to visit Greenwich Park and head for the rose garden.

Michelle Meilland in Greenwich Park

Michelle Meilland in Greenwich Park

Michelle Meilland in Greenwich Park

Michelle Meilland in Greenwich Park

Pink Paeonies – The Essence of Summer

The Paeony Borders in Greenwich Park seem rather smaller and more restrained this year, but perhaps I am imagining it. Right now the paeonies are displaying themselves completely unrestrainedly, in pink, magenta, and white, and somehow managing to survive all the rain.

Paeonies in Greenwich Park

Paeonies in Greenwich Park Paeonies in Greenwich Park

Paeonies in Greenwich Park Paeonies in Greenwich Park

And I am sharing this with Garden Photography.